Page 1 of 16 1 2 3 11 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 155
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Brookfield, WI
    Posts
    141
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Engraver's Script Instruction

    Hi,

    I hope Sam will forgive me for reposting this instructional link. I am a penman/calligrapher with a specialty in a form of shaded script (see my image posted below) that is known by many names including Roundhand, Engraver's script and Engrosser's script. This particular form of shaded script is sometimes described as 'engraving on paper'. Most modern calligraphers would could all of these variants named above as 'Copperplate'.

    I have been teaching instructional workshops on this subject for many years. In addition, I have made ALL of my instructional materials (articles and videos) available online without cost on the website of The International Association of Master Penmen, Engrosser's and Teachers of Handwriting at:

    http://www.iampeth.com

    I am very aware that the approach to forming letters is different for pen versus burin; however, the resultant letter forms should be the same visually. A penman once told me that every shaded stroke of the pen has two lines. As you already know, the pen nib forms these lines in one stroke whereas the burin requires separate strokes. I took his advice to heart and spent MANY hours drawing my letters one line at a time similarly to the way the Engraver for form the letter.

    As I've said above, I make ALL of my instructional materials available without cost since my day job pays my bills. At some point I will publish a Book/DVD instructional manual for my style of script. If any Engravers on this site are interested Iíve decided to make my complete Copperplate Workshop Handout available to members of this site. There is no cost and no catch. You may download and print the complete 87 page Workshop Handout at:

    http://www.zanerian.com/VitoloBookHandoutComplete3.pdf

    I just ask that you do not distribute this file since it will serve as the basis of my future instructional book should I ever get around to publishing it. The instruction manual is composed of several of the articles Iíve published over the years. Please keep in mind that these are individual articles pasted together; therefore, the narrative does not read as a cohesive book. Even though it is intended for pointed pen instruction it is my hope that Engravers will find the concepts contained with in helpful. I will be posting additional concepts in script under this post.

    Regards,

    Joe Vitolo


  2. Likes Robert W Waters, Kevin Scott liked this post
  3. #2
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Brookfield, WI
    Posts
    141
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Of Ovals and Compound Curves

    The fundamental form common to all Engraver's script letters is the oval. This 'oval' form further influences another very important fundamental shape, the compound curve. Here is a study I did using the capital 'B'

    Regards,

    Joe


  4. #3
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Brookfield, WI
    Posts
    141
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Here is a follow up on the formation of the capital 'B'.

    Joe


  5. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Manassas, VA
    Posts
    1,693
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Joe, Thank you for sharing you knowledge of penmanship and do you think it will ever be taught in schools again? J.J.
    JJ Roberts
    School of Artistic Engraving
    Manassas, VA
    www.angelfire.com/va2/engraver
    www.jjrobertsengraver.com


  6. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Covington, Louisiana
    Posts
    7,116
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    5

    Default

    Joe, we are grateful for your generous help with lettering study. The imaginary ovals really help with drawing of this letter. I wonder if some of our members would care to engrave this and maybe we can get a discussion going on cutting script, as I think cutting the letters with a burin as opposed to a pen causes subtle changes to the shapes of of the shade strokes. For instance, hand engravers are taught that the beauty line (the first stroke in your illustration) has a slight swell to the bottom portion. I believe this is a result of the beauty cut being made in two cuts. With hand-push gravers we traditionally cut in a counter-clockwise direction if we're right handed, so the beauty stroke is done in two cuts, starting with the bottom and finishing the lighter portion of the stroke at the top. This tends to make a slightly less symmetrical shade cut that has a larger swell toward the bottom. With pneumatic handpieces we don't have to follow the rigid counter-clockwise rule of the hand-push engraver, although for consistency we quite often adhere to that for many of the script lettering cuts.

    bergling_B.jpg

    Here's the letter B from JM Bergling's book Art Monograms and Lettering from Google Books. As you can see, his version has the slight swell at the bottom of the beauty cut. I'm curious to know your thoughts on this as a penman.

    Thanks for this discussion! / ~Sam

  7. Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Philadelphia, Pa, USA
    Posts
    187
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    In Meek's book, Art of Engraving page 92 he shows the script alphabet also showing how ovals are used to produce quality script. Seems I have seen the concept in another engraving book also but not sure.
    I need to study Dr. Joseph's lessons because my engraved script lacks a certain elegance that I see in quality engraved and written script. In addition to improving my cutting skills.
    Kevin Scott

  8. #7
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Brookfield, WI
    Posts
    141
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Hi Sam,

    That is a beautiful 'B'. Engraver's Script (Roundhand) does not have a fundamental letter style. Contrast this to Roman capitals and you can point directly to Trajan's Column as the fundamental to which all such letters are compared. I have seen compound curves used where the main heft of the shade below the midpoint of the stroke as seen in the exemplar you posted. In fact, it is commonly seen on Spencerian/Ornamental scripts (see image below). The 'B' you posted is not as slanted as many handwritten forms which typically range from 52-55 degrees of slant. If anyone is struggling with forms like 'B, P and R' please see the following article (also found in my workbook page 58):

    http://www.iampeth.com/lessons/engro...d%20Curves.pdf

    Also, another important concept in the underlying symmetry of these letters (B, P and R) can be seen in this image I like to call the 'Rolling P':



    Regards,

    Joe

    Quote Originally Posted by sam View Post
    Joe, we are grateful for your generous help with lettering study. The imaginary ovals really help with drawing of this letter. I wonder if some of our members would care to engrave this and maybe we can get a discussion going on cutting script, as I think cutting the letters with a burin as opposed to a pen causes subtle changes to the shapes of of the shade strokes. For instance, hand engravers are taught that the beauty line (the first stroke in your illustration) has a slight swell to the bottom portion. I believe this is a result of the beauty cut being made in two cuts. With hand-push gravers we traditionally cut in a counter-clockwise direction if we're right handed, so the beauty stroke is done in two cuts, starting with the bottom and finishing the lighter portion of the stroke at the top. This tends to make a slightly less symmetrical shade cut that has a larger swell toward the bottom. With pneumatic handpieces we don't have to follow the rigid counter-clockwise rule of the hand-push engraver, although for consistency we quite often adhere to that for many of the script lettering cuts.

    Attachment 15732

    Here's the letter B from JM Bergling's book Art Monograms and Lettering from Google Books. As you can see, his version has the slight swell at the bottom of the beauty cut. I'm curious to know your thoughts on this as a penman.

    Thanks for this discussion! / ~Sam

  9. #8
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Brookfield, WI
    Posts
    141
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Spencerian and Ornamental Script

    I am not sure if any Engravers use these beautiful forms. The first specimen of Ornamental script was penned by past master Henry P. Behrensmeyer (1868-1948). The second specimen is regarded by many to be one of the finest examples of Ornamental script and was penned by Albert D. Taylor (1863-1898).

    Henry P. Behrensmeyer (1868-1948)


    Albert D. Taylor (1863-1898)


    Regards,

    Joe Vitolo

  10. Likes KCSteve, Cloudy liked this post
  11. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Bellingham WA
    Posts
    163
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Thank you Joe! This is going to take my lettering up a level!

  12. #10
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Brookfield, WI
    Posts
    141
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Letter Proportions

    Hi,

    It is important in script when trying to tweak/perfect your letter forms to consider the geometric proportions of your letters. For anyone interested, you can download my lettering guidelines for practice. You can find the link here:

    http://www.iampeth.com/lessons/guide...VideoClips.pdf

    On the first page you will find the diagram below that provides insight into the proper use of these guidelines. The purpose is not to lock you into one letter proportion or slant angle but rather it provides you with fixed reference points to construct your letters consistently. Once your forms are consistent you can always vary your script to your artistic needs.

    Joe Vitolo


  13. Likes scott99 liked this post

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts


Knife Treasures


Download Videos


Lee Griffiths


BPE

Cafe page views since 18-Nov-2006.