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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Forest Hills, NYC
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    Default High Relief Help! (or headache!)

    So... My old man is turning 65 this Sept. and as a birthday gift I am building him a Mauser Sporter in 270. win. After countless hours of honing the action, carving a a stock and general gunsmithing, it is now time to engrave. The grizzly old man is a huge fan of the old high relief from (think Fuger or anything out of Suhl). I will be engraving (carving?) a super deep Eichenlaub (oak leaf) pattern with heraldric motiffs. Any Ideas on what graver to use or shape to grind to? I normally use 90 and 120 glensteels, but I am afraid that they might cut to wide relative to depth. Also any technical tips would be grateful. Thanks well in advance for the help!
    Det. Ed Nusser

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    I use a 90 to cut all of my deep releif work. Cut the pattern with a light cut, and remember that the cut you make will become background in the end. Go back and cut it deeper, leaning the graver so the wall is almost vertical, until you reach the depth you want. Use the 90 again to hog out the background, cross cutting to remove material, then use a flat to make the background uniform and flat. It's a lot of work, but worth it in the end. A high speed air tool will get that background out in a hurry.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Western PA
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    I find when I'm carving I seem to use everything on my bench. Whatever will work that's what I use. Flats, squares, knife gravers, finishing stones you name it.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Los Angeles area, California.
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    Hi Ed, and thank you for your service.
    For high relief oak leaves I cut my first outline with an ongelette into the background area to get a pretty vertical outside edge.
    After background removal I hollow out the inside of the leaves with round bottom gravers and ongelettes and also create folded edges and raised veins on the leaves. You can also use punches to add to the effect and some engravers do all their modeling with punches.
    I often also take an undercutting chisel and make a pass or two where the bottom of the leaf where it joins the background.
    Done right this can actually raise some leaves above other leaves and also the parent original surface.
    You might also do some research on the website of the great Austrian engraver and friend of the forum Martin Strolz.
    Another good reference would be the book Waffen Gravuen. Many pictures of the work of the Ferlach engravers.
    Best regards.
    Last edited by John B.; 07-16-2010 at 10:33 PM.
    John B.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Bismarck, ND
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    When you draw it out, pay close attention to the negative space.
    The background area, make smaller than you might think you should or it will overpower your scrolls. And you will have more to dig out!


    Just my 2 cents , for what it worth.:big grin:
    Last edited by metalchipper; 07-16-2010 at 11:21 PM. Reason: mess spleled words

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Forest Hills, NYC
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    Thanks for the advice. If I'm feeling brave I may even attempt my first sculpting job. I'll post some pics when I'm done!

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