View Poll Results: What is your main tool for cutting a channel for gold inlay?

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  • Onglette

    18 15.25%
  • Round

    5 4.24%
  • Flat

    53 44.92%
  • 90

    16 13.56%
  • 105

    7 5.93%
  • 120

    8 6.78%
  • Other

    11 9.32%
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  1. #11
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    I use a scorper which is a flat made from a square graver. Because the sides are ground in a "reverse" fashion (which means whatever size flat you decide on remains parallel) they give any remaining metal somewhere to flow to and give a neater cut than a standard flat graver. It's a very old fashioned tool but sometimes the old ways are hard to beat.
    cheers,
    Marcus




    "The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of the low price is forgotten."

    www.hunt-engraving.co.uk

    www.kindlerthorpe.com

  2. #12
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    Hi Marcus

    You've talked of the scorpers before. Is there any chance you could post a photo or a drawing of one please. I just can't picture your description.

    Cheers
    Andrew

  3. #13
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    Nov 2006
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    I make the same tool as Scott, but it has a 120 degree point on it. Keep the heal very short and it turns curves very well

    Joe

  4. #14
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    Nov 2006
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    Joe, Do you have a parallel heel on the 120 degree bottom, or a traditional heel? If you get deep do the sides throw up a burr? I've been trying an onglette and the sides seem to be throwing up a burr.

    Marcus, I'm with Andrew - please show us the scorper.

    Thanks to everyone for participating.

  5. #15
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    Tira, I use a traditional heal. I make the tool out of flats that are close to the size needed. I keep the heal very small to help with the burr problem on very tight curves and there is always a burr on those real tiny loops. On large curves the cuts are clean in 416. On the softer materials using more cuts to get the depth helps. I use a 25 degree heal on these and that also helps.

    I don't think you could have a parallel heal. It is too small. After the tool is cut to the width you just put a heal on it. The heal go all the way to the edge of the tool. The heal is the only shaping of the point needed.

    joe
    Last edited by Joe Mason; 02-26-2010 at 02:39 PM.

  6. #16
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    A scorper from "Engraving on Precious Metals":
    Last edited by Kevin P.; 06-08-2010 at 01:40 AM.

  7. #17
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    Sorry guys, I've been a bit busy the past few days to photograph one of my scorpers. Thanks for postin that Kevin. What I use is basically the same thing.

    If you want to try one out the geometry for a sharpening fixture is 60 for the heel with a 15 lift/post. Then the flat is put on at 15 lift also. The 60 sides make the flat parallel whatever the width. Get this wrong and you'll get a tapered flat which won't work or rather, it will to a certain degree but the first time you resharpen you'll get a different sized flat.
    cheers,
    Marcus




    "The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of the low price is forgotten."

    www.hunt-engraving.co.uk

    www.kindlerthorpe.com

  8. #18
    Join Date
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    Covington, Louisiana
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    I've always cut a V-channel with a square and then flatten the bottom with a flat graver. I don't claim it's the best method but it's worked for me. I think I'll try some of the various gravers suggested in this excellent thread! :thumbs up:

  9. #19
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    Nov 2006
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    Missouri
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    I use a square graver ground to the width of the line I want to inlay.

    Marcus, I make all my flats up on one corner like that. I never knew there was a real name for that.
    I use a flat made that way except with sides vertical to relieve background. I usually put a 55 degree face on it and about a 30 degree heel. Gives great clearance to dig out a hole.

    Ray
    School of Fine Art Engraving
    learningtoengrave.com
    cover@sbcglobal.net

  10. #20
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    Marcus, "the geometry for a sharpening fixture is 60 for the heel with a 15 lift/post" and "The 60 sides make the flat parallel whatever the width." It seems counter-intuitive that this would produce parallel sides. I'm missing something here.

    If one starts with a square blank at 0 do you rotate to 60 with the post at 15 and then mirror that? I would think that one would rotate the head to 90 to get parallel sides?
    Could you clarify?
    Kevin P.

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