View Poll Results: What is your main tool for cutting a channel for gold inlay?

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  • Onglette

    19 14.73%
  • Round

    7 5.43%
  • Flat

    57 44.19%
  • 90

    18 13.95%
  • 105

    7 5.43%
  • 120

    9 6.98%
  • Other

    12 9.30%
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Doylestown, PA
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    Default Gold Inlay Tool Survey

    Hello members! What is your favorite tool for cutting the main channel for gold inlay (not the undercutting tool). There are many ways to accomplish the same job, but it would be interesting to see what we are using.

  2. #2
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    Hi Tira,
    I am assuming you mean for a border, not a cavity? For long borders I use a flat of the width I need. This WON'T work on tight curves but will on a gentle radius. You need to keep the heel short to keep from tearing as well. It might not work for everyone but I like it as it keeps the width uniform and the channel is easier to prepare for an undercut.
    For tight turns and curves, I just use a square.
    Rex

  3. #3
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    Yes, Rex - just for borders or small line type work. Cavities are a different animal... Do you knock the corners off the flat so it tracks around slight curves or do you find it doesn't matter?

    I've come across many people who do excellent work and each seems to use a different tool which is why I asked the question. I know people who uses an onglette, a flat (now 2 people), a square, a round, and a 120. Interesting to see how many ways to accomplish the same thing.

  4. #4
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    Tira,
    I have knocked of the corners but didn't find it made much difference. I just use a short heel. If I need to do a LONG straight line such as on a floorplate of a rifle I will use a flat with a longer heel for just the long part however. It will track a bit better.
    I also will add that I will kick up "teeth" in the bottom of the cut if the line is wide. Maybe not needed but can't hurt. Also, it keeps the gold from "walking" as you set it.
    Again, this is how I do it but doesn't mean it is the only way. I just learned this way and it works for me in most cases.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    East Springfield, Ohio, United States
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    Default

    I use a flat too but I don't knock the corners off for two reasons:
    1. It takes too much time---I'm constantly touching up the face for cutting consistency.
    2. I want that razor sharp corner when cutting the line.
    I don't use a flat for most curves. Shallow curves can be OK, but I always seem to get some kind of heel drag

    And if you use my method, those corners seem to get knocked off all by themselves...ha,ha.
    Last edited by BrianPowley; 02-24-2010 at 04:17 PM.
    Brian
    www.powleyengraving.com
    http://engraversnotebook.blogspot.com

    "I dare you to believe in yourself. You have no idea how many wonderful things you are capable of doing."---Brian Powley

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  7. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    in the land of Scrolls, somewhere between Lindsay, GRS and Ngraver
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    Default

    I voted 105, but I really use a 110 bottom that has the sides parallel ground like a flat.
    Scott Pilkington
    http://learn2engrave.com/scottshistory.shtml
    A gun and a parachute have a common dynamic. When you need one nothing else will really suffice.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    East Springfield, Ohio, United States
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    Scott, great advice. I'm going to try that.
    Just grind the sides parallel and to the width of your inlay.
    I bet the control is so much better than a flat.
    (Those flat fellas can get kinda "squirrelly"----if you know what I mean)
    Brian
    www.powleyengraving.com
    http://engraversnotebook.blogspot.com

    "I dare you to believe in yourself. You have no idea how many wonderful things you are capable of doing."---Brian Powley

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    Baker City , Oregon
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    I use a 90 for gold lines because it is esier to control but for harder inlay material I go back and flatten the bottom with a flat. My theory is that gold and silver are soft enough to take the undercut well in any shape of cavity. Iron and other harder materials require a cavity with a vertical wall to insure a good anchor.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Stockton, California & Taxco, Guerrero, Mexico
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    Default

    Onglette for line inlay. Usually #3 HSS.

    Don't have to be switching gravers to go around corners, tracks better than a flat for me.

    Not to mention that I am a creature of habit...


    Brian Marshall
    SJAS
    Stockton, CA USA 95209
    209-477-0550
    instructor@jewelryartschool.com
    http://jewelryartschool.com/

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Bismarck, ND
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    Default

    90 first

    then a flat

    for cornering I grind off the back sides behind the face of the
    flats, makes it bad for resharpening but it works


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