+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 18
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Jackson,Mississippi
    Posts
    18
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Hello,newbie in search of direction,tools

    Hello Everyone...
    I am amazed that i stumbled upon this forum, this place is full to the rim with talented artist

    My name is Russell , I have a deep love for metal craft of many types, casting, and metal carving.
    For the past several years, I have read and read about hand engraving,I always have loved the art of leafing, and flourishes made by a talented engraver.
    I have hand carved quiet a few items in Brass/bronze, all of these items, Have been freehand with a foredoom rotating hand-piece.
    I purchased a cheap electric engraving tool(not worth its packaging...lol), I tried to use it in the method of a graver, no such luck.

    My closest purchase to true hand engraving, was a purchase of several hand graver tools, they to where not very useful as a tool,My hope was to try to learn to engrave on scrap brass,or cold rolled steel,I had no luck other than scoring the surface.

    Could anyone help direct me to a few beginner tools, so I could get started, this would be a true gift to me, I would love to learn this beautiful art......
    Below is a example of my carving and casting work,this device was cast,carved and machined (milling machine), every part was hand made except the Allen screws that holds the machine together........Russell

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    St. George Ut
    Posts
    614
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Welcome Russel, I too have a passion for metal and art. Getting started depends on how much money your willing to invest in tools. I started w an onglette and 40 flat graver w wooden handles, about $20. Try to absorb as much info as possible and don't be afraid to ask questions.
    Jeff Parke

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    Posts
    4,319
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Hi Russell

    & welcome to the forum.

    Jeff is right, it's one of those deals where you can start out cheaply with a few hand tools...............or you can start paying a fortune.

    It all depends on your budget, amount of time you have etc etc.

    One thing I would recommend is take an engraving class. That will give you a bit of direction and a feel for the whole thing.

    Cheers
    Andrew

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Fargo, ND
    Posts
    185
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Andrew.......And then before to long you have $6500.00 tied up in tools.

    Roger

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Northern Kentucky
    Posts
    2,053
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Russell,

    As a beginner I will suggest you click in the link below my signature which will take you to the online hand engraving glossary. There you will find over 300 engraving terms explained with over 400 pictures for illustration. This glossary contains descriptions of all the tools we use and styles of ornamentation.

    Good luck,

    Roger
    C. Roger Bleile
    Author of American Engravers and American Engravers-The 21st Century
    http://www.engravingglossary.com/
    FEGA Historian
    NRA Benefactor Life Member


    Without craftsmanship, inspiration is a mere reed shaken in the wind. Johannes Brahms

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Jackson,Mississippi
    Posts
    18
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Thanks so much for the replys, I appreciate you guys not shuning a new commer to the hobby of hand engraving.
    I have saved up money striktly for the purchase of Hand Engraving tools, I just am not sure where to start, I have read that tool brand shouldn't be discused and always abide by forum policies, I am a moderator of a Tattoo forum.

    Thanks for the glossary link, I will read it beginning to end until I have a good understanding.

    Reguarding Engraving classes, I have searched and searched, the closest class to me is more than a state away...., I would take a class in a new york second if one was nearby.
    (I'm hurt right now and can't ride in a car for long at all without extreme pain)

    I read that the 901 headpiece is a great all around headpiece.

    I own a small silent type compressor that is used for airbrushing...etc,
    The compressor I have already, Im in need of a few obvious things...

    A good swivel vise and a good beginner hand piece,also steel stock to make gravers with,I make all my own metal lathe tools, so shaping and sharpening shouldn't be a problem.

    Please any links,tips, or direction to get me started would be wonderful......Russell

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Livermore,CA
    Posts
    144
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Russell; I'm a tattooer too, this open exchange of information is nice, huh? Much like tattooing however,I don't think there is a way to get into this w/o getting very involved. I started by taking a class that had all major brands of equipment ,so you can try them all out and chose.No matter which you chose, good gear isn't cheap. A week or two of instructions and a power graver set up and the other things you'll want, like sharpening equip., workbench, vise,books,DVDs, handtools,ect.,ect, can soak up thousands of dollars real fast. It's kind of like tattoos or sex, the more you get, the more you want. Best of luck, Dave

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    Posts
    4,319
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Hi Russell

    The money is the cheap bit weather or not it's $1 or $10,000. Time is your biggest cost

    A few basics.............

    Hammer & chisel along with push graving will be the absolute cheapest way to go.............but your learning curve will be a lot longer for actual metal cutting. But it is still widely used and a great way to go.

    Once you start to get into Pneumatic equipment than you start with an NGraver flexishaft engraving system. After that you get into airtools which are either GRS or Lindsay. These will lessen part of the learning curve..........but only part and not by a lot, maybe a few months.............depending on how much time you are going to spend practicing..................... Engraving is a very big subject and there is a lot to learn.

    It's not that we don't like discussing brands which is fine on the forum if you want to. The trouble is some users tend to get a bit vocal and over the top about which brand is the best one to use. All this does is confuse the hell out of a novice and create unnecessary strife. A bit like a Texan walking into a bar and telling everyone that his hat is better than anyone else's.........then the fun begins.

    The reality is...........they are all good. There is no "mine is better than yours" as all the tools are only that..............tools. It is what is between your ears, how skilled you can become with your hands and a little bit of your soul that will create a work of art or a butchers mess. The tools have nothing to do with it. I suspect the same is true of your tattooing

    Work out a budget and do your homework thoroughly.............. and go from there because things can get out of hand pretty quickly. One thing I can assure you is that all of the tools are first class quality and they all do what they are designed to do......cut metal. How well it's cut has nothing to do with the tool that you buy................. as that part of it is entirely up to you.

    One thing that I would highly recommend is a sharpening system. That is the one thing that will be of infinite help and get you sharpening tools so that you at least have a fighting chance at cutting metal. Lindsay or GRS, take your pick as they both sharpen tools. The GRS sharpening system (power hone, dual angle holder) is probably the most versatile out of the two. The Lindsay templates/hand sharpening system (you can use a power hone with it as well) locks you into the preset angles of the templates and only sharpening certain gravers etc. Which is fine if you don't mind that.................so it's a matter of pays your money and be happy because both systems work very well.

    There are other decisions to make are, do you want to use a microscope? If you do that brings in a whole bunch of other factors. Your airbrush compressor will drive you nuts with an airtool so you have to think about that as well.


    Cheers
    Andrew

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Buffalo, New York, United States
    Posts
    262
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    If you don't already have it I suggest you get a copy of "The Art of Engraving" by Meeks... It took a lot off the learning curve for me. What clinched it was taking a class. It will fill in a lot of the blanks. You get to try out a lot of really good equipment, all of course you will want - but you can determine what you need to get by. I'm from Buffalo and I made the trek out to Kansas for a class at GRS with Sam. Well worth the trip. Next time I think I will fly though:thumbs up:
    Ron VanOstrand
    =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
    VanOstrand Metal Studio
    http://www.vmstu.com

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Covington, Louisiana
    Posts
    7,278
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Hello Russell, and welcome to the Cafe. You're getting some sound advice from the members and there's not much more I can add. Go slow, do your research, and soak up as much info as you can before you buy. This is a very informative group and we certainly welcome newcomers to the art of engraving and will do what we can to get you started on your journey.

    Enjoy the forum and happy holidays!

    ~Sam

    Join me on Facebook


    Instagram


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts


Knife Treasures


BPE


GRS Skyscraper


Lettering for Hand Engravers

Cafe page views since 18-Nov-2006.