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  1. #1
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    Default New iGraver tutorial - Running wheat border

    One we never seem to tire of, the running wheat border is a true classic gun engraver's border that can be used on many items besides guns (see Fred Carter's recent thread for an excellent example of running wheat). It also looks great in raised or flush gold. If you're new to this border, this tutorial will help you get up to speed quickly. / ~Sam

    Running wheat border tutorial
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  2. #2
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    Sam another fine tutorial. What's your thoughts on tipping the graver when cutting the leafs instead of going back and cutting the vien segments. Just picking your brain a bit.
    I think Igraver getting to be the best thing since ah? the power hone. I was going to say sliced bread but I don't like sliced bread
    Mike

  3. #3
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    Mike: I'm not sure I understand your question. I definitely roll the graver when cutting the leaf/boat shapes, but there's no rolling of the graver on any other cuts. / ~Sam

  4. #4
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    Sam: I mean the nick cuts and the leaf cut all in one cut. Like roll the graver to the left or right to make the nick cuts. I hope I said that right. No biggy.
    Thanks
    Mike

  5. #5
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    Default

    Oh, I see what you mean. Well, in jewelry engraving you'll often see leaf borders which are quickly cut with one graver pass that have a nick-like appearance on the edge of the leaf. For the running wheat, I want the nicks to be sharp and triangular which necessitates seperate cuts for each one. Why not give your idea a try and see how it works? / ~Sam

  6. #6
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    Hi Sam.
    Another great tutorial, clean and clear. Thank you.
    The only thing that I found a little different to help beginners, was in the layout lines.
    I had them use three layout lines evenly spaced apart.
    Until they developed an "eye" it helped them to keep the "boat" points centered on the middle line.
    Just thought that this might be some additional help to folks starting out with this beautiful border.
    Hope you don't mind my butting in, you do a fantastic job of teaching.
    John.

  7. #7
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    Hi John. I don't consider anyone's suggestions butting in! Yes, three layout lines does make sense, especially for people learning to cut the running wheat border. Thanks for the suggestion, and I'll remember to mention it to future students. Cheers! / Sam

  8. #8
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    Default Using the computer

    It can be very time consuming drawing all these lines and making sure the proportions are correct. Being an IE (industrial engineer) I make every attempt to make the layout process as efficient as possible (as that is my day job). In IE terms, get rid of the "NON VALUE ADDED TIME". I will post a thread on this concept later. I have drawn most of my boarders on paper, layout sheets, visio, autocad, etc. If it's hand drawn I scan it into the computer. I save the scan in Adobe photo shop or most any other software and from there I can reduce or enlarge as required. This can be done either with the ratio locked or unlocked. With the ratio locked you can enlarge and reduce and the proportions will stay the same throughout. If not you can narrow and stretch the item however you want. You can also copy and past one image onto the other and continue a running border if it needs to be that long. When doing a long straight border this is a BIG time saver. Since it is saved in my computer, it takes me about 2 minutes to resize and print the image. If you use the transfermagic method the lines are small and crisp.

  9. #9
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    Yves: Thanks for the good info on using the computer to expedite certain engraving layout tasks. I'll be looking forward to your thread on Non Value Added Time. That sounds very interesting.

  10. #10
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    Hi sam. could you give me a link to tutorials.? Thanks in advance for interesting examples, such as spike-like ...

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