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  1. #1
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    May 2009
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    New River, AZ
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    Default Can this be removed or??

    Good morning everyone,
    I have a desire to buy one or two Parker Bro. SXS's. I was wondering if any of you have dealt with removing the zigzag pattern on one of these types of shotgun I have pictured? It seems like it should be achievable with a lot of elbow grease using files and stones. Any helpful hints would be greatly appreciated.


    pix031265808.jpg
    Don R. Curtis
    New River, AZ


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Manassas, VA
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    Don,That not a problem the zigzag pattern is not cut that deep,just be careful not to looses the sharp edge's on the parts when removing the zigzag pattern.The Parker is a V grade. J.J.
    JJ Roberts
    School of Artistic Engraving
    Manassas, VA

    www.angelfire.com/va2/engraver

    jjrengraver@aol.com



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  4. #3
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    Nov 2014
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    Wells KS
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    Don, if you know how to use a file correctly it won't take long, if you don't have good skills with a file do yourself a favor and practice elsewhere.
    Leland

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  6. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Your local hardware store should have everything you'll need for restoration work,files,wet & dry automotive papers and Tire has a nice assortment of files and polishing stones in her catalog. J.J.
    JJ Roberts
    School of Artistic Engraving
    Manassas, VA

    www.angelfire.com/va2/engraver

    jjrengraver@aol.com



  7. #5
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    New River, AZ
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    Thank you. I have amassed Gesswein Diemakers and Mold maker stone sets with all the grits and sizes they offer, files (single cut), small files (all sorts), paper of all grits.

    I will give this a go. Gonna start on either a Winchester 1890 or my Ithaca NID (the one with the rolled on dog scene). If those go well then I will get the Parkers Baby steps.

    Don Curtis
    Don R. Curtis
    New River, AZ


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  9. #6
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    May 2009
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    New River, AZ
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    DBL Posted. Sorry!
    Last edited by Donny; 08-15-2017 at 12:00 AM. Reason: DBL posted...
    Don R. Curtis
    New River, AZ


  10. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    Northeastern North Carolina
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    I feel that you are more than capable of doing the job. Just as a suggestion, you might consider first start with a 2X3 inch piece of 3/4 to 1 inch cold roll steel and learn how to first draw file that flat ... Im sure you will be able to remove the marking on the guns ... just get the "feel" (how the files work, proper stance, correct hand positions / holding etc.) first on a low value practice plate. Then once you are comfortable with your ability to file the surface flat, move on to the "good stuff". I remember the old time machines at work talk about their apprenticeship programs...they learned how to square up a block of steel by hand with first files and then continued to refine all the surfaces with stones and finally lapping the surfaces....all the while maintaining 90 deg. angles all around. Most of them still had the samples squirreled away in their tool boxes ... they were so proud of them and remember the work it took to pass inspection.
    You can do it, practice a little bit and just take your time.

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  12. #8
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    New River, AZ
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    Archie,
    Thank you for the suggestion...I have been doing that since last weekend. In truth, and I will be totally honest. I HATE COLD ROLLED STEEL NOW. I never realized it was so cupped! I've always just sanded it without draw filing the piece first. its taken me the better part of an hour to get it flat with the file and remove all of the EDM scale. I have had difficulty finding the right combination of stone and paper to polish it to a smooth 600 grit finish. I haven't been able to find a step by step on the subject unfortunately. BUT I will eventually find my way.
    Don R. Curtis
    New River, AZ


  13. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
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    JUNCTION CITY OREGON
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    One suggestion, file as close as you can to finish.
    I was taught that once you start sanding or using a stone you shouldn't go have to using a file.
    Sanding/stones will leave particles behind in the surface that will ruin your files if you go back.
    You can get a pretty nice finish with drawfiling.

    Remember to vary the direction of travel for each grit, so you can see the previous grit scratches as you work them out.
    0, 45, 90 degree etc.

  14. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
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    JUNCTION CITY OREGON
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    Oh, also those thick plastic nail files are pretty useful, cut them to fit into narrow areas.
    Or use double sticky tape to stick sandpaper to popsicle sticks.
    On smaller parts, you can take a full sheet of wet/dry sandpaper stuck onto a sheet of glass and rub the part on the paper.
    Its easier to hold the parts flat that way.

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