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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by jerrywh View Post
    I will tell you one other thing that helped me a lot. When your looking at the graver always try to look a the face of the graver. In other words do not look down over the graver from the back. I hope I have made this understandable.
    like brian, for me-- looking a bit ahead of the graver works best for me

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  3. #22
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    Aug 2007
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    Thanks everyone for the tips! I think my problem may have been that I am using a 120 degree graver. As mentioned earlier I am going to switch to a 90 degree square graver and see how that works out. Appreciate all of the tips and I'll keep you posted!

  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ishokenmei View Post
    Thanks everyone for the tips! I think my problem may have been that I am using a 120 degree graver. As mentioned earlier I am going to switch to a 90 degree square graver and see how that works out. Appreciate all of the tips and I'll keep you posted!
    i think it matters little how experienced one is. it remains a given that different gravers are going to require minor adjustments of the wrist to make the geometry work just right. it is wise to experiment with diverse gravers/geometries. it allows one to find the "perfect tool" for the job.

  5. #24
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    I find that when cutting straight lines, especially long ones, breath control is paramount to cutting. I take a breath (after preparing myself mentally), let out about halfway and hold it there. Realize you don't actually "hold" it in the traditional sense but just let it stay there, taking very shallow breaths, almost breathing but not exactly. It's hard to explain, but its the same as when shooting. This, along with all the other tips here should help you cut correctly.

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  7. #25
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    Ground out a 90 degree graver this evening and was able to get about eight two inches lines cut, before daddy duty called me out. I understand what you are saying about angles and playing around with different gravers. The more I practice, the better I will be able to get a handle on knowing what my graver is going to do. As far as the 90 degree graver goes, I found it cut deeper, and I was able to keep fairly equal size lines. Still not perfect, but I am still on plate three. Overall, there is a vast difference between plates one and three, so I am very optimistic for toppling the straight line task I've set out on.


  8. #26
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    Nov 2006
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    MTC learn to use one graver , master the control. Doesn't not matter which one, worry about the other tools afterward .

  9. #27
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    Nov 2011
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    That 90 will be a big help. The logic behind it, is the more acute your tip, the more forgiveness there is in terms of line width, if your line depth happens to wander slightly up and down.
    The flip side of this is a more obtuse point might be better suited for beauty cuts, and you can get a lot of variation and weighting out of quite fine lines. Mind, you can do both with both geometries.. with practice

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  11. #28
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    Aug 2007
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    So I finally inked up one of my castings that I have had lying around on the bench.....surprise surprise. I am engraving way too deep. I can't believe I didn't catch that! I suspect its going to get a lot easier from here due to this "critical" observation. Shaking my head...shaking my head.....

  12. #29
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    Jun 2016
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    From what I've seen of my own practice and other beginners along with comments here I'd say going too deep is one of the most common characteristics of beginners.
    Jeremy

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  14. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crossbolt View Post
    From what I've seen of my own practice and other beginners along with comments here I'd say going too deep is one of the most common characteristics of beginners.
    Jeremy
    That, and the "death" grip!

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