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  1. #11
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    Mitch, having a beautiful, imaginative and distinct style in this game is no small thing.

    Jim
    Last edited by Jim Kelso; 04-13-2014 at 01:38 PM.

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  3. #12
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    Nov 2006
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    Eden, NC
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    I'm really glad you did this interview Mitch. Now when I come for a visit I won't ask so many questions....well, not conversational questions anyway! Looking forward to it.

    Bill

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  5. #13
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    Nov 2006
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    Portales, NM
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    Thank you Sam and Mitch, that was great!

    Stewart

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  7. #14
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    Jun 2007
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    Kansas City, MO
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    Quote Originally Posted by Weldon47 View Post
    Of course its all great but….my favorite quote & definitely food for thought!
    "Along those lines, I really wish there were more -heck, ANY- market demand for engraving as standalone works of art. It's virtually 100% dependent on/secondary to the objects upon which we work and its perceived value therein. A $2500 knife + $5,000 engraving = $7,500 engraved knife. A nicely turned or machined block of polished steel with an equivalent amount of engraving = "practice plate" or "demo piece". It sometimes seems as if engraving has no independent intrinsic value at all. Would anyone base the value of a painting or sculpture on the price of the canvas or bronze? And no, I really don't have a clue what can be done about it. Sssiiiggghhh….."
    Thanks Mitch & Sam!

    I've been thinking about this and I think part of it is that most of us are much better engravers than salesmen. As a counter argument I offer up this thread by Phil Coggan:
    Paperweight

    I think it would be an interesting challenge to pick a simple standard object - say, a 2.5" diameter, 1" thick steel disk and see who can engrave and sell it for the most. Maybe an idea for a FEGA auction?
    Enjoy!

    Steve :->

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  9. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    washington, pa
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    nice and interesting. great looking work, mitch. i wish not to "be like anyone else", but sure wish i could engrave like some of the folks that post here. like you, for example !

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  11. #16
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    Jul 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by KCSteve View Post
    As a counter argument I offer up this thread by Phil Coggan
    thanks for helping make my point, Steve. Phil's lovely tchotchke is a very, very notable exception. in other words, not a counter argument at all, but a glaring example of how rare it is for a client to commission such an item. every pro on this forum should be able to cite one or two such works, perhaps even annually, and most- like myself- have never done one in our entire careers.

    a few years ago I had a client even admit that he collects knives almost entirely for the engraving, but when i proposed he start commissioning objets from his favorite engravers he immediately replied, "Oh, no! There's just no market for that sort of thing. I'd be the only one and my collection would be worthless." Whaddaya gonna do?
    Mitch Moschetti

    MRM ENGRAVING
    www.mrmengraving.com

  12. #17
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    Jun 2007
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    I'm trying to think of another art form that's used almost exclusively as decoration. I think that's why it's hard - in people's minds - to separate engraving from its base object.

    As I said, it's a sales problem but it's one that affects the entire art form rather than any individual. Perhaps if more engravers started doing simple canvases (like paperweights) the idea of engraving as engraving, rather than decoration, could catch on.
    Enjoy!

    Steve :->

  13. #18
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    Nov 2006
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    outside Albany in SW GA
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    The industrial revolution made many luxury engraved items into production line items for the masses. Very few care if their paper weight is a Coggan or not. This gentleman also had a gun to match I believe. Many gun boxes have engraved and or inlayed name plates. One of us engraves plates to print wine bottle labels, Many of the Emporia students engrave to print, several do instruments. My customers don't care who I am or how I accomplished their work they just want it to show off and that is all. Mine is nicer than yours. Unfortunately my customer base are also cheap mostly redneck peckerwoods (learned to recognize them when I moved to south Georgia). They complain about the price of a customized knife or gun or spurs engraved but they don't seem to mind $650 a month truck payment for one they have to spend mega bucks to make it different as it is just like everyone else's (but my 79 dually).

    Lots of more to say but I wont inflict you any further with my bit))(^.
    Want to learn to engrave, "cut an inch a Day every Day" Jim Small
    Fred Marrinan

  14. #19
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    Jul 2007
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    yeah, Fred, it pretty much boils down to if you can't shoot it, cut with it, play it, wear it (you or your horse), or print with it, there is no reason to bother engraving it. frustrating, ain't it?
    Mitch Moschetti

    MRM ENGRAVING
    www.mrmengraving.com

  15. #20
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    Mar 2013
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    Baton Rouge
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    Mitch,
    Wonderful interview. It's nice to get to know the man behind the work. Your observations about engraving not being valued as a stand alone art form is spot on. I think that it's one of the reasons it's hard to command the prices we need to make a living. Our work is all to often seen as just "garnish" for the main course. 9 out of 10 inquirers are flabbergasted when I tell them what my hourly rate is but they wouldn't hesitate to write a check for $70 an hour or more for a brake job on their Honda.
    I do think that it is partly our job as engravers and artists to do what we can to change how public views our work. It would be wonderful to see framed engravings on the wall of a local gallery. I believe it's possible but only through concerted effort from us. As long as we focus our efforts on knives and guns, I don't see this perception shifting.
    Thanks Mitch for a thought provoking and insightful interview.
    Layne

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