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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Doylestown, PA
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    Mike, Yup I'm loving the Enset. I've been testing it since Basel and I haven't found anything it can't do yet. It's intuitive in the way it operates - step on the pedal and it speeds up - like a car or sewing machine. However, it also lets you moderate your speed if you need to like on this project. At the base where the "bowl" attaches to the stem - that's a very difficult place to have the scroll intersect - at that junction. I didn't hesitate to design it like I did because I knew the Enset would allow me to have the control to go as fast or slow as I needed to, to get through that area and navigate not only the extreme curve, but the obstruction as well. It also had enough power that I made most of the cuts in one pass as opposed to making a layout type cut to judge the trajectory and then going over it which is how in the past I have done a lot of this type of work. Instead of sweating bullets and being super vigilant at the time I was working on this I really had what I would describe as "relaxed control". And I didn't slip even once. It made me very pleased.

    Another aspect of the machine that I am enjoying is the character of the cuts. I can adjust the handpiece so that the cut looks smooth and you can not detect chisel marks or I can make the stroke length long so that I get very pronounced chisel marks - or anywhere in between. It allows for a lot of character that I wasn't expecting. My current project is a set of 5 William Henry knives that will be done completely on the Enset. I've adjusted the stroke so there is a little chisel chatter in the cuts and they are darker and seem more organic. I also have some other WH stuff that I have on my bench that was not done with the Enset and you can tell the difference. Both are technically accurate and beautiful, but they are different.

    I'm actually working on revising the instruction manual for the units right now. I need to make a full review of how the entire system works and get it up, but I've been a bit busy lately. Let me know if you have any further questions.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mendocino. ca., and Scotland
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    1,594
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    Tira,

    Great to see your mouthpiece finished and mounted on the horn!

    That was just the kind of review on the new hand piece that I find very valuable, and I am intrigued, always fun to hear about a new approach, and very dangerous for a tool addict like me!!

    Rod

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  4. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    washington, pa
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    beautiful, tira. maybe i will send you my trumpet mouthpiece !

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    washington, pa
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    aside from your engraving skills, tira-- i nominate you to be the forum engineer/inventor ! simple things like that clamp can make the difference between fun and total aggravation. my worst ever invention-- took me about 2 days to create a solution for holding 2 harley front fenders. way less time to do the engraving.

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Doylestown, PA
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    Thanks Monk! Yup, sometimes the most frustrating part is the holding... and yet, I keep taking those crazy jobs.... I appreciate your thought.

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