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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Mountain View Arkansas
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    Thanks Chris, I'll have a go of it with some low carbon steels. Enjoy your cookouts.....
    Rod

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    klamath falls
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    i agree a laser welder is a good option but you will need some wire that is the same metal to fill those pits. still it will take hours to be done.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    5mi from the nearest Dunkin Donuts in Tennessee
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    Default For the non-believers out there ...

    ... using a jewelry laser welder to fill pitting on an old gun. This piece is a finger lever for a circa 1880s Winchester Model 1873. Probably a poor example to use as it is too far gone to save but it's the only original part here that hasn't either been circular filed or sold. It is a good candidate to illustrate that this process works and is a viable option for any classic that has value and is worth saving.

    The red circle indicates the section that this repair will focus on ...



    Closeup ...



    Draw filed and stoned ... deepest pits remaining ...



    Small ball bur used to clean out crud and rust ... the laser does a pretty good job at blasting out the rust and crud but physically cleaning them out is always safe.



    Holes filled using laser and mild steel wire. Pulse set to low and Laser intensity set to lowest setting then increased to point where it melts. Beam can also be widened to smooth shallow pits and smooth filled areas. Blue circle indicates a deep pit that took a lot of metal and I ran out of wire. The pit may have been a tiny inclusion that opened up to corrosion as this part was likely made prior or during Winchester's transition to open hearth steel and hence of a lesser quality.



    Draw filed and stoned to 600grit then hit with 800 grit wet/dry wrapped on a block. The deep pit still evident at the top makes a good reference point. A few more blasts with the laser and filler and it would be gone as now would also be a good time to fill or smooth any remaining imperfections.



    Total lasering time was about 15 minutes. There's also a short video of the laser in action which will likely end up on my web site along with a more thorough description of this illustration as it's doubtful this will ever make the tips archive.

    All the best .... Chris
    Last edited by Christopher Malouf; 06-03-2012 at 03:56 PM.

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  5. #34
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Christchurch, New Zealand
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    4,289
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    Fantastic thanks Chris!!!

    I'm sure that's what dentists do to my teeth

    Cheers
    Andrew

  6. #35
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Manassas, VA
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    1,709
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    Chris,That was some nasty looking pitting,but you did a really nice job restoring the old 73 and I can't wait to see it engraved,keep up the good work.J.J.
    JJ Roberts
    School of Artistic Engraving
    Manassas, VA
    www.angelfire.com/va2/engraver
    www.jjrobertsengraver.com


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