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  1. #11
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    Interesting topic Arnaud, and thanks for the hat-tip Andrew. The Japanese have a genre of engraving based on emulating ink-brush strokes. Sometimes it is quite simple and some more elaborate. It is somewhat related to bright-cut and I’m not sure if this fits in your concept Arnaud or if you are thinking of only narrow uniform lines.

    Katakiri-bori as it is called is cut with a flat chisel and the line width can vary from quite narrow to quite wide by healing the chisel over dramatically(or not). This gives something of the effect of a calligraphic type brush that can paint a line varying from very thin to quite wide. Shading is achieved by widening the lines, along with visible hammer strokes within the lines, rather than parallel shading as in the west.

    Here are four photos of excellent work of this type.
    1) a kashira(sword handle cap) by Kano Natsuo
    2) a small kozuka knife handle engraved by Kano Natsuo
    3a & 3b) an Imperial presentation vase, early 20th century engraved by Kobayashi Kako and raised from pure silver sheet by Hiraka Soko. The peony does not have much shading and yet somehow conveys much form and depth. The plum branch shows clearly how the hammer strokes add texture and character. This is more elaborate than maybe you are driving at but the close-up of the plum branch gives an idea of a simpler approach.
    (Vase photos courtesy Kagedo Gallery)

    I think that with the ingenuity of engravers as a whole there is opportunity to express a lot of beauty with this style that is not necessarily Japanesque.

    NatsuoKojiriweb.jpgNatsuoPeonyKataweb.jpgKatatkiriweb copy.jpgkatakirivaseweb.jpg
    Last edited by Jim Kelso; 05-11-2012 at 03:05 AM.

  2. #12
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    Thanks Jim and sure it fits in this concept idea. I just know little about Japanese Art, but it seems worth to study it.
    The examples you show here, yes they look simple, but I know they are not. In Japanese art it is not about coincidence. As far as I know they think first about all the details to have them in perfect balance.
    So while I’m exploring other ideas technique and forms, this is something to consider as well, not copying it, but taking it in my library of knowledge.

    arnaud

  3. #13
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    Arnaud, you 've got an interesting point there! Although I never was a big admirer of Picasso's abstract period. I prefer his early works (before it all turned cubist/simplistic) but that 's just 'personal taste', as I never liked cubist works from any other known artist, for much of their stuff it looks like one doesn't need any skills! OK maybe I 'm wrong, also because time proved they often had great succes with abstract and minimalistic 'art'. To me the rich & natural ornamental style goes much better for engravings, perhaps it 's all about the kind of 'canvas' that has to be decorated (just my 2 cents folks). Greetings, Paulie

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  5. #14
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    Hi Arnud, I'm with you, I like seeing some fresh imagery in engraving. As I'm still a beginner I focus on traditional scroll patterns because I feel an engraver has to have skill in scroll work and it is still my favorite. When I see work by Vlastik Petak and Houdek Roman, I drool. I wish more engravers would just break away and do what comes to mind.I've said it before that too many engravers overdo their work, tiny scrolls that can only be seen with magnification. It's like they're servicing their own egos and not the desires of the customer. I've always prefered a simpler, easy to read design over super detailed , hyper realism. I find stylized designs easier on the eye and more fun to look at. I can do with out Picasso however......... just my opinion. ,,,DG

  6. #15
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    The ability to execute an image using a single line is an example of a highly refined draftsman's hand coupled to an sensitive eye, or a bit of really random luck. That line can often capture what in art school is known as "gesture", an implication of motion, or impending motion. I think it goes to an increased sense of design and awareness of the real minimalist requirements to stoke someone's imagination. Like poetry, the suggestion is enough to jumpstart the imagination of the viewer, rather than the book, chapter and verse of the detailed description. Like poetry, an acquired taste. I find the extraordinary fantasy work by Torcoli intriguing, interesting, and yet, still within the traditions of classical engraving. You raise the question of where to go next in this art form, since change is inevitable, and clinging dogmatically to the past is limiting, and, eventually, fails.
    I think everyone involved needs to be thinking about where they are going, not just hanging on to the past. You have to know the traditions in order to escape them, but you need not be bound by them.

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  8. #16
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    If Jack Kerouac was an engraver would he have done "beat" engraving?
    All the best,
    Barry Lee Hands
    www.barryleehands.com
    " Think outside the box? are you sure there is a box?"-Barry Lee Hands

  9. #17
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    Hi Arnaud, I was just thinking about your thread on innovating engraving styles and I suddenly remembered that this idea was not really 'new under the sun' When checking out Fega on facebook I noticed a very innovative engraving design which I believe that I've seen earlier here on the Cafe. This engraving style is something really different & I like it more than Picasso (for engraving) of course. Just my personal taste http://www.fega.com/mp/hoechst/side4web_1.jpg Greetings, Paulie

  10. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paulie View Post
    Hi Arnaud, I was just thinking about your thread on innovating engraving styles and I suddenly remembered that this idea was not really 'new under the sun' When checking out Fega on facebook I noticed a very innovative engraving design which I believe that I've seen earlier here on the Cafe. This engraving style is something really different & I like it more than Picasso (for engraving) of course. Just my personal taste http://www.fega.com/mp/hoechst/side4web_1.jpg Greetings, Paulie
    love this gun, now that is what I am talking about, I want to do my 1911 like this.

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  12. #19
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    Why not doing something truly contemporary... I took a few minutes of time to create a sample.
    ...multi-colored precious metal inlay might not be the best way to execute such ideas... too expensive and noble, probably hard to sell tough.

    Martin

    Grafitti from:http://www.life-go.de/artikel/10/print10.html
    Attached Images

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  14. #20
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    Martin, I don't know much about selling guns or gun engravings. So yes could be hard to sell, but perhaps not. I think no one ever tried that, and that is exactly the point I try to make.

    Thanks all for your ideas on this.
    And no one mentioned Andrew's designs yet, but in a way that too does look different in design, not really classic scrolls.



    So here is another Picasso, and besides that Andrew's shows some Maori style, to me they both have something in common.




    arnaud
    Last edited by Arnaud Van Tilburgh; 06-08-2012 at 08:11 PM. Reason: some spelling

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